796. bitterblue

The clichéd take on Cat Stevens is that he was a hippie singer songwriter type who lost his nut somewhere along the line and suddenly decided Allah was Great and death to the infidels (or whatever). Which is mostly wrong. And rather completely misses the point that, even with all the MOR hippie hits (most of which weren’t really that bad), he could still genuinely surprise on occasion. Case in point, Bitterblue, particularly the guitar bit near the beginning, when it suddenly kicks from standard strumming into an almost mystical overdrive. Allah be praised.

CatStevens-smoking

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31. The Solid Time Of Change

Installment #31 of the Solid Time of Change aired on Saturday March-4-2017 (c/o CiTR.FM.101.9).

Podcast (Solid Time begins a few minutes in). Youtube playlist (somewhat inaccurate).

The Solid Time of Change is our overlong yet incomplete history of the so-called Prog Rock era – 661 selections from 1965 through 1979 with which we hope to do justice to a strange and ambitious time indeed, musically speaking.

solid-crop-31

Part Thirty-One of the journey went as follows:

  1. Queen – tenement funster
  2. Queen – flick of the wrist
  3. Queen – lily in the valley
  4. Cat Stevens – 18th Avenue
  5. Gentle Giant – wreck
  6. Donovan – celtic rock
  7. Led Zeppelin – no quarter
  8. Led Zeppelin – the battle of evermore
  9. Jethro Tull – cold wind to Valhalla
  10. Jethro Tull- with you there to help me
  11. Emerson Lake + Palmer – Knife Edge
  12. Emerson Lake + Palmer – Tarkus [somewhat modified]
  13. England – poisoned youth
  14. Electric Light Orchestra – one summer dream

Fresh episodes air pretty much every Saturday night, starting 11 pm (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9, with streaming and download options available within twenty-four hours via our Facebook page.

13. The Solid Time Of Change

Part thirteen of the Solid Time of Change  aired Saturday August-13-2016 c/o CiTR.FM.101.9.

Podcast (Solid Time begins at around the 5 minute point). Youtube playlist (incomplete and probably inaccurate).

This continues to be Randophonic’s main focus, our overlong yet incomplete history of the so-called Prog Rock era (presented in countdown form) – 661 records from 1965 through 1979 with which we hope to do justice to a strange and ambitious time indeed, musically speaking.

solid-crop-13

Part thirteen of the journey went as follows:

  1. Emerson Lake + Palmer – hoedown
  2. Raspberries – overnight sensation (hit record)
  3. Electric Light Orchestra – Mission [a new world record]
  4. Electric Light Orchestra – dreaming of 4000
  5. Queen – Seven Seas of Rhye
  6. Queen – my fairy king
  7. Barclay James Harvest – mockingbird
  8. Cat Stevens – miles from nowhere
  9. Doobie Brothers- clear as the driven snow
  10. Camel- song within a song
  11. Camel – another night
  12. FM – black noise [part-1]
  13. FM – headroom exerpts
  14. David Pritchard – an admission of guilt [excerpt]
  15. FM – black noise [part-2]
  16. Peter Hammill – dropping the torch
  17. Strawbs – lay a little light on me + hero’s theme

Fresh episodes air pretty much every Saturday night, starting 11 pm (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9, with streaming and download options available within twenty-four hours via our Facebook.

993. miles from nowhere

“A Cat Stevens song about being profoundly somewhere that didn’t overstay its welcome in my ear drums. Top 40 radio didn’t play it much. It wasn’t on the Greatest Hits album. You had to actually play the album Tea For The Tillerman to hear it, or find a movie theatre that was cool enough to be showing Harold + Maude.” (Philip Random)

CatStevens-1976

 

1062. 18th Avenue (Kansas City Nightmare)

Everybody (or their big sister) had a copy of Cat Stevens Greatest Hits back in the day, and it was a pretty darned good collection in a heartfelt folkie-poppy sort of way. But if you really wanted to know the depth of the Cat, you had to go to track one, side two of the album Catch Bull At Four, a song called 18th Avenue (Kansas City Nightmare) which managed in its less than four and a half minutes to cover all manner of mood and intensity, all of it cloaked in doom and shadow and, despite the obliqueness of its lyrics, definitely going somewhere.

CatStevens-CatchBULL