1064. mixed up confusion

“Contrary to popular belief, Bob Dylan went electric as early as 1962 with this honest eruption of confusionism that I didn’t get to hear until the early 90s sometime when I stumbled across a cheap copy of the Biograph box set, back when everyone was dumping all their vinyl, buying CDs. Thank you all for that.” (Philip Random)

Dylan-mixedUP

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1065. wish you were here

Curious George were one of many solid (if messy) punk-hardcore-whatever bands slamming around Vancouver in those curious years of perpetual struggle (otherwise known as the 1980s), their cover of this rather tired Pink Floyd original driving home the point that it’s seldom the song that’s wrong, only the performance. There is nothing wrong with this performance.

CuriousGeorge-cassette

1068. ball and chain

XTC were never quite punk; they were too pop savvy for that. Though they were there from the beginning, tearing up fragile facades with the best of them.  So maybe just call them a damned good band who, by 1982’s double-vinyl English Settlement, were taking off in a pile of different directions uniquely their own, with Ball and Chain reminding us that they still had the pop.

xtc-EnglishSettlement

3. The Solid Time Of Change

Part three of the Solid Time of Change aired Saturday May-21, 2016 c/o CiTR.FM.101.9.

 

Youtube playlist (possibly not the exact versions that were played). Podcast.

Also known as as the  661 Greatest Records of the so-called Prog Rock era, the Solid Time of Change is Randophonic’s latest countdown, an overlong yet incomplete history of whatever the hell happened between 1965 and 1979 – not in all music, not even in most of it, but definitely in a bunch of it.

What is Prog Rock? Is it different from progressive rock, or for that matter, rock that merely progresses? These may seem simple questions but they are in fact doors that open unto some of the most complex enigmas of this split-atomic age. And thus we are committed to exploring them in depth with a radio journey that shall likely take us a full year complete.

crop-psycheFISH

Part three of our journey went as follows:

  1. Triumvirat – The march to the Eternal City
  2. Aphrodite’s Child – you always stand in my way
  3. Aphrodite’s Child – do it
  4. Renaissance – the vultures fly high
  5. Camel – freefall
  6. Alice Cooper – The Man with the Golden Gun
  7. Alice Cooper – unfinished sweet
  8. Soft Machine – a certain kind
  9. Yes – wonderous stories
  10. Bee Gees – Odessa (City on the Black Sea)
  11. Led Zeppelin – ten years gone
  12. Genesis – looking for someone
  13. Vanilla Fudge – some velvet morning
  14. Hawkwind – 10 seconds of forever
  15. Hawkwind -Brainstorm
  16. Hawkwind -down through the night
  17. Quicksilver Messenger Service – the fool

Installment #4 airs Saturday, May 28 at 9pm (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9.

1061. ceremony

“Spring 1980.  I first hear of a band called Joy Divison.  Apparently, they’re like a new wave Doors. Which is all I need to hear. I head down to Quintessence Records prepared to pay big bucks for an import. Except, ‘Sorry,’ says the guy at the counter, ‘we’re sold out since the main guy killed himself.’  Ouch.  Maybe six months later, we start to hear New Order , the band that rose from those ashes – cool and eerie and sounding exactly like the future.” (Philip Random)

newORDER-cassette

1062. 18th Avenue (Kansas City Nightmare)

Everybody (or their big sister) had a copy of Cat Stevens Greatest Hits back in the day, and it was a pretty darned good collection in a heartfelt folkie-poppy sort of way. But if you really wanted to know the depth of the Cat, you had to go to track one, side two of the album Catch Bull At Four, a song called 18th Avenue (Kansas City Nightmare) which managed in its less than four and a half minutes to cover all manner of mood and intensity, all of it cloaked in doom and shadow and, despite the obliqueness of its lyrics, definitely going somewhere.

CatStevens-CatchBULL