334. Blues for Allah

“I really tried to ignore the Grateful Dead at first, shrug them off as brain damaged hippies or whatever. And I pulled it off as long as I focused on their more normal stuff. But then I’d stumble onto something like the Blues For Allah suite found at the end of the album of the same name. You don’t even need acid or perhaps peyote (though they do help), it takes you high, it takes you deep. You have no clear compass on where you even are, but it’s a necessary place, you had to come here, with Allah himself sitting right next to you, comfortable, your feet hanging over the edge … of all eternity.” (Philip Random)

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451. the man in the long black coat

An atypical Dylan track, given its comparative lack of words, the great man holding back some, letting the atmosphere speak (c/o Daniel Lanois’ masterful production). So in the end, it’s like a troubled dream that never resolves, just leaves you with questions and shadows and rumours of apocalypse. Who is he anyway, the man in the long black coat? And why does the mere thought of him fill you with dread?

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533. Jason + the Argonauts

Five albums into their career and XTC were simultaneously sick to death (literally) of the obligatory punk-pop-new-wave bullshit and ready for something big. And big was definitely the word for English Settlement, a double album at a time when bands just didn’t do that anymore. And an album it was. Yes, a few singles were released, but the songs worked best together, all in a rich, sumptuous flow, with Jason and the Argonauts stretching things out almost progressively – whatever that word even meant anymore come 1982.

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543. Africa talks to you [the asphalt jungle]

Sly and Family Stone’s There’s A Riot Goin’ On is one of the best albums period, from any genre, any era. A seamless flow of barely post-1960s truth-telling, most of it rather grim. Africa Talks To You [the asphalt jungle] is the strange dark heart of it – not a song so much as an excursion, a side trip to a multi-dimensional galaxy that’s equal parts heavier than a planet, lighter than air. And yes, that is a drum machine keeping things in line, a good decade before it was the hip thing to do.

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552. and your bird can sing

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The Beatles at their power pop peak, cranking out perfection at a faster rate than the culture could even begin to handle. And Your Bird Can Sing wasn’t even included on the North American version of Revolver. Got stuck on the compilation album Yesterday and Today instead, the one with baby dolls and butchered meat on the cover. Which quickly got pulled, of course, the forces of decency in full combat mode. Oh those loveable moptops.

Beatles-1966-Shea

43. The Solid Time Of Change

Installment #43 of the Solid Time of Change aired on Saturday July-8-2017 (c/o CiTR.FM.101.9).

Youtube playlist (not entirely accurate).

The Solid Time of Change is our overlong yet incomplete history of the so-called Prog Rock era – 661 selections from 1965 through 1979 with which we hope to do justice to a strange and ambitious time indeed, musically speaking.

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Part Forty-Three of the journey went as follows:

  1. Led Zeppelin – when the levee breaks
  2. Yes – roundabout
  3. Yes – Ritual [edit]
  4. Who – Dr Jimmy
  5. Who – the rock
  6. Who – love reign o’er me
  7. Gong – Radio Gnome Invisible
  8. Gong – Flying Teapot
  9. Gong – The Pot Head Pixies
  10. Gong – The Octave Doctors And The Crystal Machine
  11. Gong – Zero The Hero And The Witch’s Spell
  12. Gong – Witch’s Song/I Am Your Pussy

Fresh episodes air pretty much every Saturday night, starting 11 pm (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9, with streaming and download options available within twenty-four hours via our Facebook page.

41. The Solid Time Of Change

Installment #41 of the Solid Time of Change aired on Saturday June-17-2017 (c/o CiTR.FM.101.9).

Podcast (Solid Time begins a few minutes in). Youtube playlist (not entirely accurate).

The Solid Time of Change is our overlong yet incomplete history of the so-called Prog Rock era – 661 selections from 1965 through 1979 with which we hope to do justice to a strange and ambitious time indeed, musically speaking.

solid-crop-41

Part Forty-One of the journey went as follows:

  1. Gentle Giant – Pantagruel’s Nativity
  2. Gentle Giant – an inmate’s lullaby
  3. Genesis – in the cage
  4. Genesis – grand parade of lifeless packaging
  5. Genesis – back in NYC
  6. Genesis – hairless heart
  7. Genesis – counting out time
  8. Queen – march of the black queen
  9. Electric Light Orchestra – Eldorado overture
  10. Electric Light Orchestra – Can’t get it out of my head
  11. Electric Light Orchestra – Boy Blue
  12. Electric Light Orchestra – Laredo Tornado
  13. Electric Light Orchestra – Eldorado
  14. Electric Light Orchestra – Eldorado finale
  15. Can – bel air

Fresh episodes air pretty much every Saturday night, starting 11 pm (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9, with streaming and download options available within twenty-four hours via our Facebook page.

748. danger bird

It’s 1975 and if you’re Neil Young, you’re hanging out in sunny California, feeling a decade older than you were three years ago, but at least the drugs are good, and sometimes the smog ain’t so bad, particularly when Crazy Horse drops by. Just plug in and play so loud it actually cuts through the haze, and mystical birds of great danger are seen soaring high, fierce and beautiful.

NeilYoung-1975

773. sickle clowns

“As the story goes, The Pretty Things never got around to Invading America properly and thus they stand as the one essential Brit band of the swinging 60s that never really made it into the so-called Classic Rock canon – the upside being that I never got remotely sick of them. Sickle Clowns comes from 1970, and as with many of the better records from that year, you can feel the change that must’ve been in the air, all the flower power well on the wane, the shadows growing. My English friend Jane says it reminds her of the youth riots of the times, even though she was too young to actually remember them.” (Philip Random)

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