586. you trip me up

The Jesus and Mary Chain seemed to come from nowhere way back when, that lost decade found somewhere within the mid-1980s. Something’s gotta f***ing give, the zeitgeist was screaming, somebody’s gotta take all this noise to its extreme edge, give us all a smug, punk sneer, call it music, cause riots, get arrested, sell records. In the case of You Trip Me Up, that meant taking a nice little la-la-la love song and plugging it into the end of the universe. Sometimes on late night radio, we’d play it at the same time as Pink Floyd’s Interstellar Overdrive, both channels maxed to eleven – like competing nuclear mushroom clouds. It had to be done.” (Philip Random)

JAMC-1984

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47. The Solid Time Of Change

Installment #47 of the Solid Time of Change aired on Saturday September 23rd (c/o CiTR.FM.101.9).

Youtube playlist – not entirely accurate.

The Solid Time of Change is our overlong yet incomplete history of the so-called Prog Rock era – 661 selections from 1965 through 1979 with which we hope to do justice to a strange and ambitious time indeed, musically speaking.

solid-crop-47

Part Forty-Seven of the journey went as follows (selections 28-23):

  • King Crimson – Red
  • Genesis – the carpet crawlers
  • Genesis – Firth of Fifth
  • Yes – The Revealing Science of God
  • Yes – The Gates of Delirium
  • Pink Floyd – shine on you crazy diamond [I-IX]

Fresh episodes air pretty much every Saturday night, starting 11 pm (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9, with streaming and download options available within twenty-four hours via our Facebook page.

673. Careful with that axe, Eugene

“A big part of the genius of the post-Syd-Barrett-pre-Dark-Side-of-the-Moon Pink Floyd is just how scattered, unformed, incomplete so much of it is – the various albums and soundtracks and loose pieces arriving more like strange and fabulous reports on an ongoing indefinable work in progress than anything remotely complete. Case in point, the numerous versions of Careful With That Axe Eugene floating around (at least one going by a different title altogether). If I had to choose only one though, it would be the live version found on side one of Ummagumma, simply because it scared the hell out of me the first time I heard it. Grade Seven sometime, a friend’s older brother having some good clean bloodcurdling fun with us on a dark winter’s night.” (Philip Random)

PinkFloyd-Pompeii

42. The Solid Time Of Change

Installment #42 of the Solid Time of Change aired on Saturday June-24-2017 (c/o CiTR.FM.101.9).

Podcast (Solid Time begins a few minutes in). Youtube playlist (not entirely accurate).

The Solid Time of Change is our overlong yet incomplete history of the so-called Prog Rock era – 661 selections from 1965 through 1979 with which we hope to do justice to a strange and ambitious time indeed, musically speaking.

solid-crop-42

Part Forty-Two of the journey went as follows:

  1. Mason Williams – classical gas
  2. Van Morrison – you don’t pull no punches but you don’t push the river
  3. Genesis – the musical box
  4. Rainbow – stargazer
  5. Deep Purple – sweet child [space truckin] in time
  6. Rolling Stones – you can’t always get what you want
  7. Beatles – strawberry fields forever
  8. Beatles – revolution 9
  9. Pink Floyd – echoes

Fresh episodes air pretty much every Saturday night, starting 11 pm (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9, with streaming and download options available within twenty-four hours via our Facebook page.

40. The Solid Time Of Change

Installment #40 of the Solid Time of Change aired on Saturday June-10-2017 (c/o CiTR.FM.101.9).

Podcast (Solid Time begins a few minutes in). Youtube playlist (not entirely accurate).

The Solid Time of Change is our overlong yet incomplete history of the so-called Prog Rock era – 661 selections from 1965 through 1979 with which we hope to do justice to a strange and ambitious time indeed, musically speaking.

solid-crop-40

Part Forty of the journey went as follows:

  1. Yes – yours is no disgrace
  2. Richard Harris – MacArthur Park
  3. Todd Rundgren – international feel
  4. Todd Rundgren – never never land
  5. Todd Rundgren – tic tic tic it wears off
  6. Todd Rundgren – Zen Archer
  7. Todd Rundgren -Le Feel Internacìonále
  8. Pretty Things – Baron Saturday
  9. Pretty Things – the journey
  10. Pretty Things – I see you
  11. Pink Floyd – astronomy domine
  12. Peter Hammill – modern
  13. Van Der Graaf Generator – a plague of lighthouse keepers
  14. Mothers of Invention- eat that question
  15. King Crimson – Asbury Park

Fresh episodes air pretty much every Saturday night, starting 11 pm (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9, with streaming and download options available within twenty-four hours via our Facebook page.

38. The Solid Time Of Change

Installment #38 of the Solid Time of Change aired on Saturday May-27-2017 (c/o CiTR.FM.101.9).

Youtube playlist (sadly inaccurate).

The Solid Time of Change is our overlong yet incomplete history of the so-called Prog Rock era – 661 selections from 1965 through 1979 with which we hope to do justice to a strange and ambitious time indeed, musically speaking.

solid-crop-39

Part Thirty-Eight of the journey went as follows:

  1. National Health – squarer for Maud
  2. Pink Floyd – interstellar overdrive
  3. Procol Harum – in held twas in I [edit]
  4. Moody Blues – nights in white satin
  5. Moody Blues – The Dream
  6. Moody Blues – have you heard [part-1]
  7. Moody Blues – the voyage
  8. Moody Blues – have you heard [part-2]
  9. Strawbs – new world
  10. Strawbs – the life auction
  11. Strawbs – ghosts
  12. Mike Oldfield – tubular bells [pieces]

Fresh episodes air pretty much every Saturday night, starting 11 pm (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9, with streaming and download options available within twenty-four hours via our Facebook page.

37. The Solid Time Of Change

Installment #37 of the Solid Time of Change aired on Saturday May-13-2017 (c/o CiTR.FM.101.9).

Podcast (Solid Time begins a few minutes in). Youtube playlist (sadly inaccurate).

The Solid Time of Change is our overlong yet incomplete history of the so-called Prog Rock era – 661 selections from 1965 through 1979 with which we hope to do justice to a strange and ambitious time indeed, musically speaking.

solid-crop-37

Part Thirty-Seven of the journey went as follows:

  1. Pink Floyd – one of these days
  2. Triumvirat – Mister Ten Percent
  3. Triumvirat – million dollars
  4. Beatles – tomorrow never knows
  5. Hawkwind – silver machine
  6. Soft Machine – moon in June [excerpts]
  7. Robert Wyatt – Alifib
  8. Robert Wyatt – Alifie
  9. Robert Wyatt – little red robin hood goes riding
  10. David Bowie – quicksand
  11. Genesis – stagnation
  12. Peter Hammill – (this side of) the looking glass
  13. Van Der Graaf Generator – house with no door

Fresh episodes air pretty much every Saturday night, starting 11 pm (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9, with streaming and download options available within twenty-four hours via our Facebook page.

764. pigs [three different ones]

Speaking of Pink Floyd, come 1977, they were pretty much the poster children for all that pompous, bloated, overblown so-called Prog Rock that Punk was supposed to be annihilating. Which made Animals a source of much confusion, because it was so full of uncompromising bile and rage, it would’ve been punk rock if the songs weren’t so long.  Pigs gets singled out here for the sheer violence of the instrumental parts, like the worst of dreams. You wake up to air raid sirens. You look skyward into the night, catch a glimpse of a pig the size of a football field, with red laser eyes, and they’re fixed on you.

PinkFloyd-pig

765. Atom Heart Mother [the groovy part]

“The title’s cool. Atom Heart Mother. Doesn’t get much heavier than that. But it’s the cow that grabbed me, which I first saw as a poster in a record store when I was maybe twelve. No group or album name. Just this cow gazing cowlike from its green field.  I didn’t get it, but I guess it got me. Later, a friend told me it was Pink Floyd, who I’d heard of but never actually heard (this being a two or three years before Dark Side of the Moon would become as common as allergies in springtime). ‘They’re acid rock,’ said my friend, which instantly meant extreme. Because acid could eat metal, right?  But then I actually heard Atom Heart Mother and it was more weird than anything, like a symphony, except it was a rock band, with space ships in the distance, and then choirs and things. No metal being eaten anywhere, unless that’s what the cow was doing, calm, significant, like a Hindu god. I particularly liked the groovy part in the middle.” (Philip Random)

PinkFloyd-atomCOW