711. Panic in Detroit

“As I remember it, David Bowie hit the suburbs of the Americas in comparatively slow motion. First came Space Oddity (a big deal AM radio hit in early 1973, some three years after it had hit big in the UK), then Ziggy Stardust (various album tracks popping up in the fringes of FM radio), by which point you were starting to see pictures of the guy. Beyond freakish. Which were backed up by the inevitable rumours (that he actually was an alien, that he and Elton John were secretly married). But by the end of the year, all that stuff was settling, and it was the music you couldn’t ignore. So Much Great And Strange Music. Entire albums overflowing with it. So much so that a track like Panic in Detroit didn’t get near the attention it deserved. If only for the riff. You could base a whole genre on that riff. Which, it’s arguable, the Rolling Stones already had. But where the hell were they in 1973?” (Philip Random)

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42. The Solid Time Of Change

Installment #42 of the Solid Time of Change aired on Saturday June-24-2017 (c/o CiTR.FM.101.9).

Podcast (Solid Time begins a few minutes in). Youtube playlist (not entirely accurate).

The Solid Time of Change is our overlong yet incomplete history of the so-called Prog Rock era – 661 selections from 1965 through 1979 with which we hope to do justice to a strange and ambitious time indeed, musically speaking.

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Part Forty-Two of the journey went as follows:

  1. Mason Williams – classical gas
  2. Van Morrison – you don’t pull no punches but you don’t push the river
  3. Genesis – the musical box
  4. Rainbow – stargazer
  5. Deep Purple – sweet child [space truckin] in time
  6. Rolling Stones – you can’t always get what you want
  7. Beatles – strawberry fields forever
  8. Beatles – revolution 9
  9. Pink Floyd – echoes

Fresh episodes air pretty much every Saturday night, starting 11 pm (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9, with streaming and download options available within twenty-four hours via our Facebook page.

721. paint it black

Eric Burdon took his whiteman-slumming-in-blackman’s-world thing all the way to the edge (and beyond) on his second (and last) album with the band known as War, with the epic take on one of the great Rolling Stones songs a definite (and definitive) highlight. It was released in 1970, but I didn’t hear until 1994.  A moment I remember all too well.  Kurt Cobain had just offed himself, everybody was fumbling around in shock at my friend Steven’s place. Suddenly some guy whose name I forget said something like, ‘F*** you, Cobain. There’s always something to live for. I bet you never even heard this.’ And then he slapped side one of Black Man’s Burdon on the turntable.” (Philip Random)

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777. jigsaw puzzle

In which The Rolling Stones, at the absolute peak of their late 1960s form, wax artful, poetic, Dylanesque even as to the nature of life, the universe, everything – and conclude it’s all just a jigsaw puzzle more or less. But not before twenty-thousand grandmas are seen waving hankies, burning pension checks, shouting it’s not fair.

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35. The Solid Time Of Change

Installment #35 of the Solid Time of Change aired on Saturday April-8-2017 (c/o CiTR.FM.101.9).

Podcast (Solid Time begins a few minutes in). Youtube playlist (somewhat inaccurate).

The Solid Time of Change is our overlong yet incomplete history of the so-called Prog Rock era – 661 selections from 1965 through 1979 with which we hope to do justice to a strange and ambitious time indeed, musically speaking.

solid-crop-35

Part Thirty-Five of the journey went as follows:

  1. Emerson Lake + Palmer – from the beginning
  2. Isaac Hayes – Theme from Shaft
  3. Deodato – Also Sprach Zarathustra
  4. Beatles – across the universe
  5. Rolling Stones – 2000 light years from home
  6. Queen – ogre battle
  7. Queen – the fairy feller’s master-stroke
  8. Queen – nevermore
  9. Jesus Christ Superstar London Cast – Overture
  10. Manfred Mann’s Earth Band – father of night father of day
  11. Frank Zappa – Big Swifty
  12. Steve Hackett – spectral mornings
  13. Steve Hackett – land of a thousand autumns
  14. Steve Hackett – please don’t touch
  15. Steve Hackett – the voice of Necam
  16. Steve Hackett – Icarus Ascending

Fresh episodes air pretty much every Saturday night, starting 11 pm (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9, with streaming and download options available within twenty-four hours via our Facebook page.

24. The Solid Time Of Change

Instalment Twenty-Four of the Solid Time of Change aired Saturday December-3-2016 c/o CiTR.FM.101.9.

Podcast (Solid Time starts a few minutes in). Youtube playlist (incomplete and not entirely accurate).

This continues to be Randophonic’s main focus, our overlong yet incomplete history of the so-called Prog Rock era (presented in countdown form) – 661 selections from 1965 through 1979 with which we hope to do justice to a strange and ambitious time indeed, musically speaking.

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Part Twenty-Four of the journey went as follows:

  1. Manfred Mann’s Earth Band – solar fire
  2. Manfred Mann’s Earth Band – as above so below
  3. Strawbs – queen of dreams
  4. Moody Blues – in the beginning
  5. Queen – in lap of the gods
  6. Queen – she makes me (stormtrooper in stilletos)
  7. Queen – in lap of the gods … revisited
  8. David Bowie – big brother
  9. David Bowie – chant of the ever circling skeletal family
  10. Rolling Stones – she’s a rainbow
  11. Wings – nineteen hundred and eighty-five
  12. David Essex – rock on
  13. Van Der Graaf Generator – darkness [11-11]
  14. Steve Miller Band – in my first mind
  15. Steve Miller Band – the beauty of time is that it’s snowing [psychedelic B.B.]
  16. King Crimson – happy family
  17. Brian Eno – the great pretender
  18. Residents – The Eskimo Edit

Fresh episodes air pretty much every Saturday night, starting 11 pm (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9, with streaming and download options available within twenty-four hours via our Facebook.

903. struttin’

Billy Preston had a pile of great moments from the late sixties through the early seventies. Fifth Beatle, sixth Rolling Stone, and a none too shabby solo careersolo career. Struttin’ gets the nod here because it’s a spaced out rip of total fun and funk, redolent of Saturday afternoons, bored, flipping through the channels, stumbling onto Soul Train, getting kicked into a whole new dimension.” (Philip Random)

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907. some girls

“Lewd, crude (some have called it obnoxious) title track from the last Rolling Stones album that anyone needs to hear. Because past Some Girls, they just wouldn’t be that dangerous anymore. Probably connected with Keith Richard finally having to clean up his off-stage act. The western world would never be the same.” (Philip Random)

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