354. Every Christian Lionhearted Man Will Show You

“The Bee Gees from very near the beginning of things, psychedelic and strange, and as good as they ever got (to my ears anyway) giving their all as every Christian Lionhearted band should, complete with chanting monks and mellotron from days of future past. They really are as good as the Beatles here.” (Philip Random)

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372. guns guns guns

Anyway you look at it, the Guess Who (straight outa Winnipeg) were the closest thing Canada ever had to a Beatles. Hell, they even outsold them in 1970. But this is two long years later. They’ve lost Randy Bachman, ace guitarist, co-founder and key songwriter, but they’re still rockin’ profoundly up and down the north side, working that giddy sense of freedom that only a superlative live band can attain. And they’ve still got Burton Cummings just sober enough on Guns Guns Guns to lay down some of the finest vocals that this planet will ever hear. Godspeed mother nature, Godspeed.

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402. on the bed

George Harrison (always the most psychedelic Beatle) offers up a nifty slice of so-called world music (before we had the lame marketing term for it). Found on the soundtrack for a 1968 movie called Wonderwall that nobody ever saw, but then Oasis copped the title for a song name a couple of decades later and went mega-platinum with it. But On The Bed is far better (and cooler) than that derivative and over seasoned pop stew.

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12. reSEARCH

An Admission of Headroom, installment #12 of The Research Series aired June-17-2018 on CiTR.FM.101.9.

The twelfth of a planned forty-nine movies, each forty-nine minutes long, featuring no particular artist, theme or agenda beyond boldly going … who knows? Or as Werner Von Braun once put it, “Research is what I’m doing when I don’t know what I’m doing.” And we definitely have no idea where all this will take us.

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12. an admission of headroom

Bob Marley – soul rebel
Jane Birkin + Serge Gainsborough – Jane B
Mahavishnu Orchestra – you know you know
Beatles – sleeping vibes
Eno + Byrne – come with us
David Pritchard – an admission of guilt
FM – headroom “reflections”
King Crimson – sailor’s tale
Giorgio Moroder + David Bowie – the myth
Propaganda – the last word [strength to dream]
Klaatu – across the universe in eighty days
King Crimson – Prince Rupert’s coda
Neu! – e-musik [part 2]
Randophonic – Oyster Bay [excerpt]

Further installments of the Research Series will air most Sundays at approximately 1am (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9, with streaming and download options usually available within twenty-four hours via our Facebook page.

011. The Final Countdown*

Installment #11 of The Final Countdown aired Saturday-June-9-2018 (c/o CiTR.FM.101.9).

Youtube playlist (somewhat inaccurate).

The Final Countdown* is Randophonic’s longest, most random and (if we’re doing it right) relevant countdown yet – the end of result of a long process that finally evolved into something halfway tangible in early 2018. The 1297 Greatest Records of All Time right now right here, if that makes sense. And even if it doesn’t, we’re doing it anyway for as long as it takes, and it will take a while.

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Installment #11 of The Final Countdown* went like this.

1092. Big Audio Dynamite – medicine show [shortened]
1091. Selecter – James Bond
1090. Peter and Gordon – a world without love
1089. Dungen – Mina Damer Och Fasaner
1088. Deodato – September 13
1087. Cornelius – Brazil
1086. Juanna Molina – Salvese quien pueda
1085. Residents – dimples + toes
1084. Bob Dylan – Mozambique
1083. Patti Smith – when doves cry
1082. Chilliwack – raino
1081. Turtles – grim reaper of love
1080. Lieutenant Pigeon – moldy old dough
1079. Echo + the Bunnymen  – all you need is love
1078. Manfred Mann’s Earth Band – time is right
1077. Chicago – a hit by Varese
1076.Cosmic Jokers – kinder alles galactic [further edit]
1075. Heart – Dreamboat Annie
1074. PFM – is my face on straight?
1073. Mothers of Invention – the air
1072. Mothers of Invention – the Duke of Prunes [amnesia + regain]
1071. Embryo – Klondyke Netti

Randophonic airs pretty much every Saturday night, starting 11 pm (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9, with streaming and/or download options usually available within twenty-four hours via our Facebook page.

439. it was a very good year

“We’ve all gotta start somewhere. Before I got seriously hooked by the superlative noise of rock-roll-psyche-whatever-you-want-to-call-it (sometime safely before my tenth birthday in the form of The Beatles Revolution the shorter, sharper, nastier version), I only really cared for one so-called pop album:  What Now My Love, a 1966 chart topper from Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass (who weren’t from Tijuana, they weren’t even Mexican). Because it was the only halfway modern slab of vinyl in my parents’ collection. And now it’s in mine, the same original record (proudly slotted between the Allman Bros and Amon Duul), because it’s actually pretty darned fine in a sangria-soaked suburban backyard barbecue sort of way. Smooth Latin rhythms and sunny day melodies and occasional gushes of rapture like the part at the end of It Was A Very Good Year when the strings come swooping in like the gods themselves. What sentimental eight year old (of any age) ever needed anything more?” (Philip Random)

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459. we can work it out

“In which a still quite young Stevie Wonder takes an entirely optimistic Beatles nugget straight to church and sort of saves us all. I suppose I may have heard it at the time (1970) percolating away in some pop radio background (while riots were no doubt tearing sh** up not so very far away). But it would be the 1990s before it slotted into the regular pop summertime playlist – all goodness and light, with children playing, birds tweeting, only occasional explosions.” (Philip Random)

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485. everybody’s got something to hide except for me and my monkey

“Patrick Gallagher was my life’s first full-on Beatles fan. Every Christmas, he’d get a new Beatles album. In 1968, that meant the White Album, two records exploring all kinds of extremes, most of them miles over our tiny heads (his ten years old, mine nine). But we liked the monkey song. What kid wouldn’t like a monkey song? Even if it turned out to have nothing to do with monkeys at all, but was John Lennon’s take on the great and faultless Maharishi being a bit of a horndog, trying to get his hands on Mia Farrow’s ass, and how this didn’t seem to fit the man’s intimations of higher wisdom and humanity. Also, maybe heroin.” (Philip Random)

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490. let me roll it

“Found on Wings’ 1973 album, Band on the Run, Let Me Roll It has been tagged by some as a Paul McCartney attack on John Lennon, part of an ongoing musical feud that stretched back to before the Beatles even split. But to my ears, it sounds more like an homage, raw and to the point (whatever the point is), and maybe the best track from the best thing he ever did post The Beatles.” (Philip Random)

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