35. The Solid Time Of Change

Installment #35 of the Solid Time of Change aired on Saturday April-8-2017 (c/o CiTR.FM.101.9).

Podcast (Solid Time begins a few minutes in). Youtube playlist (somewhat inaccurate).

The Solid Time of Change is our overlong yet incomplete history of the so-called Prog Rock era – 661 selections from 1965 through 1979 with which we hope to do justice to a strange and ambitious time indeed, musically speaking.

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Part Thirty-Five of the journey went as follows:

  1. Emerson Lake + Palmer – from the beginning
  2. Isaac Hayes – Theme from Shaft
  3. Deodato – Also Sprach Zarathustra
  4. Beatles – across the universe
  5. Rolling Stones – 2000 light years from home
  6. Queen – ogre battle
  7. Queen – the fairy feller’s master-stroke
  8. Queen – nevermore
  9. Jesus Christ Superstar London Cast – Overture
  10. Manfred Mann’s Earth Band – father of night father of day
  11. Frank Zappa – Big Swifty
  12. Steve Hackett – spectral mornings
  13. Steve Hackett – land of a thousand autumns
  14. Steve Hackett – please don’t touch
  15. Steve Hackett – the voice of Necam
  16. Steve Hackett – Icarus Ascending

Fresh episodes air pretty much every Saturday night, starting 11 pm (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9, with streaming and download options available within twenty-four hours via our Facebook page.

829. dig a pony

A comparatively un-heard Beatles track (found on Let it Be), and one that John Lennon (its composer) wrote off as ‘a piece of garbage’, and yet it still made it to that famous rooftop concert. “What it is, is kind of loose, kind of incomplete, kind of confusing. In other words, it’s the truth about the Beatles as things were all falling apart. I’ll take it over Long And Winding Road any day, or Yesterday for that matter.” (Philip Random)

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852. I Me Mine

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It turns out that I Me Mine was the very last Beatles track to be recorded, and it makes sense — a rant on the topic of ego from George Harrison who’d always had a hard time getting his songs on the albums. Something he was about to make up for, big time. But that’s another story.

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862. Key

“In which Canada’s The Guess Who, on the verge of genuine BIGness (they’d be outselling the Beatles in 1970), smell the wheat and get cosmic, reference the Bible and otherwise lay down the elusive truth for all god’s children. Seriously, note the title. It’s not The Key, but simply, significantly, psychedelically KEY.” (Philip Random)

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903. struttin’

Billy Preston had a pile of great moments from the late sixties through the early seventies. Fifth Beatle, sixth Rolling Stone, and a none too shabby solo careersolo career. Struttin’ gets the nod here because it’s a spaced out rip of total fun and funk, redolent of Saturday afternoons, bored, flipping through the channels, stumbling onto Soul Train, getting kicked into a whole new dimension.” (Philip Random)

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936. here there + everywhere

In which Emmylou Harris, who never found a song she couldn’t somehow make her own, takes one of the very few sweet, poignant, utterly beautiful Beatles songs that we’re not all allergic to and, if anything, improves it. “If I ever actually get married, I can imagine it will be prominent in the day’s proceedings.” (Philip Random)

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952. beyond the valley of a day in the life

In which the Residents sample the Beatles and make such a glorious mess of things that rumours eventually surface that they are in fact The Beatles themselves, undercover. And all of this at least a decade before sampling-stealing-pirating in the name of art had even begun to achieve hip status. “I actually heard this when it was new in 1977. Not that I was remotely cool at the time, more the opposite. A friend’s big brother heard me talking loud about how progressive rock was the only music that really mattered, because it was so inventive, so ambitious, so strange … so he got me high and set me straight on the fact that there were far, far stranger things going on out there in the name of music than I ever could have imagined.”

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A Traditional Randophonic Christmas

Randophonic’s first ever attempt at a proper Christmas show aired December 20th on CiTR.FM.101.9.

Here it is in two Mixcloud streams.

Plus a very special Movie of the Week — Monty Python’s Pleasures of the Dance.

The podcast of the full program is available for download here …

A special program in which we look back with fondness at cherished memories of Christmases past. Try to anyway, as it turns out the Jukebox is still stuck in minimum 49-percent prog-rock mode after the previous week’s 1974 blowout.

Which isn’t to say there aren’t plenty of highlights, seasonal and otherwise.

Sorry about that. The rest are guaranteed highlights, presented more or less in the order they were broadcast.

Van Der Graaf Generator – theme one

Written by George Martin for some TV show or other. Reimagined for drums, keyboards and various horns by Van Der Graaf Generator at their 70s freakout peak.

Manfred Mann’s Earth Band – Joybringer

Ripping off Gustav Holst, and owning it.

Jethro Tull – King Henry’s Madrigal

They don’t say which King Henry, though this strikes us as decidedly Shakespearean. Which raises the question. Where the hell are all the rocked up Shakespearean Christmas carols?

The Clash – if music could talk …

… then we truly would have peace on earth.

Delaney + Bonnie – where the soul never dies

What it’s really all about.

Beatles – Christmas time + The Word

The word is love.  The time is now.

Emerson Lake + Palmer – Jerusalem

An interpretation of William Blake’s cosmic musing on Britain’s industrial revolution (those dark Satanic mills) and Jesus Christ himself taking a little walk ‘cross England’s green and pleasant.  ELP at their least annoying.

Waterboys – December + Spirit

December even mentions the Christ child, but it’s not so much a Christmas song as a meditation on the gloomiest time of year, and how we always seem to find the light to see our way through, which seems to be what spirit’s all about.

Van Morrison – St. Dominic’s Preview

A song about many things, most of them indecipherable, but there is homesickness at the root of it. You think Buffalo’s a long way away? Try Belfast.

Manfred Mann’s Earth Band – father of night, father of day

In which the Earth Band manage in ten minutes what Bob Dylan’s original accomplished in less than two.  And yet, we’re pretty damned sure that the good Lord has love enough for both.

Link Wray – alone

Sad but true.

Mandalaband – The Eye of Wendor

From the first part of a long lost trilogy.

Joseph Spence – Santa Claus is coming to town

No one’s ever mumbled it better.

Ian Anderson – God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen

Philip Random’s favourite Christmas carol is not completely ruined by this sort of jazz rock arrangement … with small orchestra.

Gryphon – second spasm

The band that brought bassoons and krumhorns to rock. And one more time, why is there not more of this sort of Shakespearean groove available this time of year?