606. revolution blues

As the story goes, Neil Young had at least a peripheral connection to Charles Manson. They weren’t exactly buddies, yet there was a sort of passing amity that perhaps could only have existed in the old hippie days of 1960s Los Angeles, the weird scenes up Laurel Canyon in particular. That was before all the slaughter, of course. After which Mr. Young found a way to get it into at least one song, in particular the part about getting armed to the teeth, hopping into dune buggies, then swarming down the canyon, exterminating everyone they saw, particularly all the hippie rock star types who hadn’t let Chuck join their club. Which was apparently a scheme that he never got around to executing. There were a bunch of those.

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748. danger bird

It’s 1975 and if you’re Neil Young, you’re hanging out in sunny California, feeling a decade older than you were three years ago, but at least the drugs are good, and sometimes the smog ain’t so bad, particularly when Crazy Horse drops by. Just plug in and play so loud it actually cuts through the haze, and mystical birds of great danger are seen soaring high, fierce and beautiful.

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826. for the turnstiles

Neil Young, reluctant rock star, still smarting from the heroin deaths of two good friends, sits on a vague beach on a vague day and plucks his banjo, waxing skeptically (if not cynically) about the nature of the game he’s playing. Apparently they were imbibing a lot of strong hemp product during the recording of this album. You’d never know.

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29. Solid Time of Change

Installment #29 of the Solid Time of Change aired on Saturday February-18-2016 (c/o CiTR.FM.101.9).

Podcast (Solid Time begins a few minutes in). Youtube playlist (somewhat inaccurate).

The Solid Time of Change is our overlong yet incomplete history of the so-called Prog Rock era – 661 selections from 1965 through 1979 with which we hope to do justice to a strange and ambitious time indeed, musically speaking.

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Part Twenty-Nine of the journey went as follows:

  1. Buffalo Springfield – broken arrow
  2. Electric Light Orchestra – Shangri-La
  3. Aphrodite’s Child – the system
  4. Aphrodite’s Child- seven trumpets
  5. Aphrodite’s Child – Altamont
  6. Tommy James + the Shondells – crimson and clover
  7. Barclay James Harvest – suicide
  8. Barclay James Harvest – hymn
  9. Gentle Giant – the runaway
  10. King Crimson – cat food
  11. King Crimson – groon
  12. Fleetwood Mac – oh well
  13. Genesis – ripples
  14. Genesis – in the rapids
  15. Genesis – it
  16. Genesis – watcher of the skies [live]

Fresh episodes air pretty much every Saturday night, starting 11 pm (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9, with streaming and download options available within twenty-four hours via our Facebook page.

890. the thrasher

In which Neil Young waxes sad and beautiful about leaving home and finding himself on an asphalt highway bending through libraries and museums, galaxies and stars. Originally found on the acoustic side of 1979’s Rust Never Sleeps, the album where Mr. Young faced the punk whirlwind, found it relevant, and thus ensured that, unlike most of his contemporaries, he would neither burn out nor fade away, but keep on keeping on.

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932. vampire blues

“In which then still young Neil Young draws the obvious connection between the vampire’s bloodlust and western man’s need for oil. In other words, we’re junkies, willing to kill for a fix. And kill we did in 1991. And then again in 2003. No Blood For Oil said all the anti-War posters and placards, but they were missing the point. The oil was blood.  It still is. And we’re still killing for it.” (Philip Random)

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1052. roll another number

Neil Young weighs in with an important public service announcement, which was recorded in 1973 on the heels of various deaths in and around the band (Crazy Horse), but not released until 1975 because everybody was just too bummed out. When it doubt, counsels Mr. Young, get stoned and go for a long drive that gets you reflecting on a recent past that seems much further away than it really is.  That’s what the rear view’s for.

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1974 – Part 2 – future legends

Part Two of Randophonic’s three part celebration of the 40th anniversary of 1974 aired December 6th, on CiTR.FM.101.9.

Here it is in two Mixcloud streams.

And the Movie of the Week — Queen – Modern Times Rock + Roll

The podcast of the full program is available for download here …

Think of it as an at least halfway cool radio program from forty years ago playing not the popular stuff from the year, but the important stuff — the true wild and innocent sounds that kept the flesheating robots at bay for another three hundred days or so.  Brian Eno gets a lot of play because he released his first two solo albums in 1974 (and they, of course, changed everything forever). Otherwise, it’s a whole lotta everything, legendary and cool.

Brian Eno – needles in the camel’s eye

It hits you like a wall of solid pop.  Powerful and beautiful.

Roxy Music – all I want is you

A smart, sophisticated rocker from the band Eno had just left. Which raises the question. What would have happened if he’d stayed? What wouldn’t have happened? Would Richard Nixon even have had to resign?

Stevie Wonder – you haven’t done nothin’

In which even the blind man can see the bullshit.  74 was that kind of year.

The Undead – somebody super like you

From Phantom of the Paradise, definitely the best Faustian glam rock movie ever.

Sweet – ballroom blitz

In which the bubble-glam wunderkids hold nothing back, tear the whole room apart.

Sparks – talent is an asset

LA wasn’t glam enough so they moved to London and never really looked back. This one’s about Albert Einstein’s relatives.

Jade Warrior – monkey chant

Take an ancient Balinese monkey chant, lay down some psyche guitar. Disturb all the hippies.

Hot Chocolate – Emma

Emma has big dreams. She wants to be up on the silver screen. Spoiler alert: she kills herself in the end.

David Bowie – 1984 + sweet thing / candidate / sweet thing

Where was David Bowie in 1974?  A decade ahead of things in the year of the Diamond Dogs. Big Brother is supreme. Everybody loves him. And why shouldn’t they? Even monsters can be beautiful.

Brian Eno – seven deadly Finns

A single that didn’t really chart anywhere yet went a long way toward inventing the future sounds of punk, new wave etc. And it has yodeling.

Brian Eno – Third Uncle

It starts as a direct rip-off of Pink Floyd’s One of These Days.  By the time it’s over, it’s found an entirely other galaxy

Badfinger – just a chance

From their last album before the suicides started — the one that’s jammed with solid pop rock gems, but for whatever reason, got yanked from all the stores almost immediately after its release.

Strawbs – hero and heroine

Title track from another one of those shoulda-woulda-coulda-but-didn’t albums. Maybe Dave Cousins voice was just too weird, because you can’t blame all those mellotrons and angels amped way high in the mix.

Wings – nineteen hundred and eighty-five

The groove’s a killer. The production is pure drama. The lyrics don’t seem to be about anything. Where’s John Lennon when you need him?

Can – chain reaction

They’d just lost Damo Suzuki to the ozone or wherever. But they didn’t seem to mind, just kept working the infinite groove, pretty much inventing techno trance more than a decade ahead of schedule without realizing it.

Brian Eno – on some faraway beach

Lead off track from his first solo album — promising so much and, of course, he would deliver so much more.

Neil Young – ambulance blues

Neil is stuck on some dreary wintertime beach waiting for the paramedics to come. But it’s not an emergency really. The damage is already done.

Van Morrison – you don’t pull no punches but you don’t push the river

The true heart of Celtic soul gets laid bare here, epic and wise. You gotta learn to spot the difference between a foe you can knock down and a force of nature you best just go with, bound for great oceans and who knows what treasures on distant unseen shores?

Gram Parsons – 1000 dollar wedding

About as sad as sad songs get. And then he OD’ed on heroin.

Bob Dylan – dirge

Mr. Zimmerman enters the truly good part of his 1970s, and he’s definitely in a mood.

Anne Peebles – I can’t stand the rain .

It always rains too much. Why should 1974 be any different?

QUEEN – MODERN TIMES ROCK + ROLL (the Movie of the Week)

An almost one hour mix of Queen at the very beginning of their muchness.  Their first album (Queen 1) was released in 1973 but nobody heard it until 1974.

And by the end of 1974, we had two more to perplex and astonish us (Queen II + Sheer Heart Attack).

And confusing indeed it all was — a strange zone where Led Zeppelin and the Beach Boys seemed to hold equal measure, and everything in between.  Or as Philip Random puts it.  “Strange wild changes, absurd operatics, serious raunch, nymphs and ogres, black queens, white queens, Jesus Christ himself, fathers and sons, tenement funsters, lilies of the valley, tatterdemalions and junketers.  Bohemian Rhapsody was still over a year away and who needed it anyway? It was all there already. And if you were fifteen year old me, you ate it up.  Because it NEVER got any better than those first three albums and their Modern Times Rock’n’Roll … for lack of a better term.”