407. big brother + chant of the ever circling skeletal family

“As the story goes, David Bowie’s first post-Ziggy Stardust album was supposed to be a musical adaptation of George Orwell’s 1984, but he couldn’t secure the rights, so it morphed into Diamond Dogs which was its own weird, extreme thing with a few explicitly 1984 songs included in the mix, including the climactic Big Brother, which manages to get quite epic before things get deeply off kilter with the Chant of the Ever Circling Skeletal Family. Which is not just some b-grade horror stuff. It’s real. I’ve heard that infernal family, while deep inside the wrong kind of acid trip, the ‘I’m Dead’ kind, the kind you just want to end, but it goes on for millions of years, with all these wraithlike forms howling at you forever, because you’re dead, you died, this is what comes next. Which I suppose is relevant to 1984. What it feels like to get stomped in the face with a boot. Forever. Great music though.” (Philip Random)

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416. cracked actor

David Bowie at his rawest, glammest, most rockingest. The time I him do Cracked Actor live, he sang it to a skull, a cracked actor indeed. Or was he an alien? Aladdin Sane being the last of Ziggy albums that wasn’t all cover tunes. Either way, it was a harder rock than pretty much anyone was delivering at the time, except maybe Iggy and Stooges at the … and almost nobody knew they even existed.” (Philip Random)

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12. reSEARCH

An Admission of Headroom, installment #12 of The Research Series aired June-17-2018 on CiTR.FM.101.9.

The twelfth of a planned forty-nine movies, each forty-nine minutes long, featuring no particular artist, theme or agenda beyond boldly going … who knows? Or as Werner Von Braun once put it, “Research is what I’m doing when I don’t know what I’m doing.” And we definitely have no idea where all this will take us.

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12. an admission of headroom

Bob Marley – soul rebel
Jane Birkin + Serge Gainsborough – Jane B
Mahavishnu Orchestra – you know you know
Beatles – sleeping vibes
Eno + Byrne – come with us
David Pritchard – an admission of guilt
FM – headroom “reflections”
King Crimson – sailor’s tale
Giorgio Moroder + David Bowie – the myth
Propaganda – the last word [strength to dream]
Klaatu – across the universe in eighty days
King Crimson – Prince Rupert’s coda
Neu! – e-musik [part 2]
Randophonic – Oyster Bay [excerpt]

Further installments of the Research Series will air most Sundays at approximately 1am (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9, with streaming and download options usually available within twenty-four hours via our Facebook page.

449. it’s no game [part 1]

David Bowie hits the 1980s in powerful form with Scary Monsters, blows minds and fuses across all known dimensions. But then that’s pretty much it. He’ll sell piles of records through the decade, make the cover of TIME magazine, and everything else for that matter… but he’ll never be truly monstrous or scary again. Which is either A. damned sad, or B. whatever.  I mean, it’s not as if he hadn’t already given us way more than enough through the 1970s, from collapsing the hippie dream to unleashing his own personal alien glam supernova, onward unto cocaine bullshit, decadence, everything. But he always kept his cool even as he lost his mind. Did any other single artist come even close? Definitely no game.” (Philip Random)

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474. here comes the night

Pin-Ups, the last of the Ziggy-era Bowie albums, was an all covers affair, in which the thin, strange alien paid tribute to the musical heroes of his youth. As a whole, the album’s not his greatest, feeling pretty tossed off overall. But the take on Here Comes The Night is superb. Loud and brash, a full-on show-stopper that at least matches the original. Which is pretty amazing when you consider Van Morrison sang that. How often has he been equaled?

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004. The Final Countdown*

Installment #4 of The Final Countdown aired Saturday-April-7-2018 (c/o CiTR.FM.101.9).

Youtube playlist (rather incomplete).

The Final Countdown* is our longest, most random and (if we’re doing it right) relevant countdown. Which doesn’t mean we’re sure yet what it’s all about – just the end of result of a long and convoluted process that finally evolved into something halfway tangible a month or so ago. The 1297 Greatest Records of All Time right now right here, if that makes sense. And even if it doesn’t, we’re doing it anyway for as long as it takes, and it will take a while.

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Installment #4 of The Final Countdown* went like this.

1234. Madlib – no more time (the change)
1233. Dinosaur L – #6 (Get Set)
1232. Buggles – I love you Miss Robot
1231. Lavender Diamond – you broke my heart
1230. High Llamas – Homespun Rerun [Cornelius remix]
1229. Minutemen – The Politics of Time
1228. Kool + The Gang – come together
1227. Sly + the Family Stone – I’m an Animal
1226. Earth Wind + Fire – Sweet Sweetback’s Theme
1225. Jethro Tull – the mouse police never sleeps
1224. Daevid Allen – bodigas-froghello
1223. Alice Cooper – unfinished sweet
1222. Beach Boys – I love to say Dada
1221. Josh Millard – hallehula
1220. John McDermott – home from the forest
1219. Japonize Elephants – fuck the pharmacia
1218. Juggernaut Jug Band – Desolation Row
1217. Brian Eno – Kurt’s Rejoinder
1216. Melodic Energy Commission – escargot + gallop
1215. Spirit – space child
1214. Quasi – sound and vision

Randophonic airs pretty much every Saturday night, starting 11 pm (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9, with streaming and/or download options usually available within twenty-four hours via our Facebook page.

505. across the universe

“The Thin White Duke (aka David Bowie, aka David Jones) at the point of pitching into thinnest, whitest, most cocaine psychotic point in his career, takes a seemingly careless swipe at John Lennon‘s psychedelic hymn to transcendence, eternity, higher meaning. And at first, it really is a sloppy mess, a blasphemy even, but then something very cool starts happening. The memory is of being drunk, maybe twenty-one, singing my head off to it while very alone, and feeling somehow saved. I think I was driving at the time, but apparently I made it home, or wherever the hell I was going.” (Philip Random)

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560. Aladdin Sane (1913–1938–197?)

“As I’ve heard it argued, Aladdin Sane (the album) is song-for-song the best of the Ziggy-era Bowie albums. Yet as a whole, it somehow doesn’t add up the way the previous two do, and thus hasn’t gotten heard as much. Which is great for our purposes as it gives us a bunch of cool non-allergenic gems, like the genuinely insane title track, particularly the part where it goes all free jazz toward the end. Stratospheres over my teenage head when I first heard it. But I listened anyway. It was David f***ing Bowie.” (Philip Random)

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592. needles in the camel’s eye

“Sometimes I need to see a song used in a movie to truly get it. In the case of Needles in the Camel’s Eye (the first song on the first side of Brian Eno’s first solo album), that movie was Velvet Goldmine, the title sequence in which glam-rock fervour erupts through drab Britain circa 1971-72. As the story goes, David Bowie refused to let director Todd Haynes use any of his music in a movie that was a essentially about him. So Haynes scrambled, signed up everybody else that was relevant at the time, and the result was perhaps more confusing than originally intended, but probably better.” (Philip Random)

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