560. Aladdin Sane (1913–1938–197?)

“As I’ve heard it argued, Aladdin Sane (the album) is song-for-song the best of the Ziggy-era Bowie albums. Yet as a whole, it somehow doesn’t add up the way the previous two do, and thus hasn’t gotten heard as much. Which is great for our purposes as it gives us a bunch of cool non-allergenic gems, like the genuinely insane title track, particularly the part where it goes all free jazz toward the end. Stratospheres over my teenage head when I first heard it. But I listened anyway. It was David f***ing Bowie.” (Philip Random)

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592. needles in the camel’s eye

“Sometimes I need to see a song used in a movie to truly get it. In the case of Needles in the Camel’s Eye (the first song on the first side of Brian Eno’s first solo album), that movie was Velvet Goldmine, the title sequence in which glam-rock fervour erupts through drab Britain circa 1971-72. As the story goes, David Bowie refused to let director Todd Haynes use any of his music in a movie that was a essentially about him. So Haynes scrambled, signed up everybody else that was relevant at the time, and the result was perhaps more confusing than originally intended, but probably better.” (Philip Random)

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628. boys keep swinging

Boys Keep Swinging being one of those David Bowie tracks that should’ve been a huge hit (and it did actually chart in the UK), but the Americas of the late 1970s just weren’t ready  for a song about boys being boys, cutting their moves, striking their poses, popping cherries, checking out other boys, looking good in uniforms. Certainly not one sung by a known alien.

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44. The Solid Time Of Change

Installment #44 of the Solid Time of Change aired on Saturday July-15-2017 (c/o CiTR.FM.101.9).

Podcast (Solid Time begins a few minutes in). Youtube playlist (not entirely accurate).

The Solid Time of Change is our overlong yet incomplete history of the so-called Prog Rock era – 661 selections from 1965 through 1979 with which we hope to do justice to a strange and ambitious time indeed, musically speaking.

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Part Forty-Four of the journey went as follows:

  1. Alice Cooper – halo of flies
  2. David Bowie – sweet thing
  3. David Bowie – candidate
  4. David Bowie – sweet thing [reprise]
  5. Yes – Siberian Khatru
  6. Jethro Tull – Passion Play [edit]
  7. Emerson Lake + Palmer – Toccata [edit]
  8. Yes – starship trooper
  9. Robert Fripp – water music
  10. Robert Fripp [with Peter Gabriel] – here comes the flood

Fresh episodes typically air every Saturday night, starting 11 pm (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9. However, Randophonic will be taking a break from new programming for a while starting next week (July-29). Our Facebook page will stay active.

711. Panic in Detroit

“As I remember it, David Bowie hit the suburbs of the Americas in comparatively slow motion. First came Space Oddity (a big deal AM radio hit in early 1973, some three years after it had hit big in the UK), then Ziggy Stardust (various album tracks popping up in the fringes of FM radio), by which point you were starting to see pictures of the guy. Beyond freakish. Which were backed up by the inevitable rumours (that he actually was an alien, that he and Elton John were secretly married). But by the end of the year, all that stuff was settling, and it was the music you couldn’t ignore. So Much Great And Strange Music. Entire albums overflowing with it. So much so that a track like Panic in Detroit didn’t get near the attention it deserved. If only for the riff. You could base a whole genre on that riff. Which, it’s arguable, the Rolling Stones already had. But where the hell were they in 1973?” (Philip Random)

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39. The Solid Time Of Change

Installment #39 of the Solid Time of Change aired on Saturday June-3-2017 (c/o CiTR.FM.101.9).

Youtube playlist (not entirely accurate).

The Solid Time of Change is our overlong yet incomplete history of the so-called Prog Rock era – 661 selections from 1965 through 1979 with which we hope to do justice to a strange and ambitious time indeed, musically speaking.

solid-crop-39x

Part Thirty-Nine of the journey went as follows:

  1. Focus – Hocus Pocus
  2. PFM – Dove … Quando [part 1]
  3. PFM – Dove Quando [part 2]
  4. Nektar – the dream nebula
  5. Nektar – it’s all in the mind
  6. Jethro Tull – My God
  7. Jethro Tull – slipstream
  8. Jethro Tull – Wind Up
  9. Camel – Nimrodel
  10. Renaissance – ashes are burning
  11. David Bowie – life on Mars
  12. Klaus Schulze – floating

Fresh episodes air pretty much every Saturday night, starting 11 pm (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9, with streaming and download options available within twenty-four hours via our Facebook page.

37. The Solid Time Of Change

Installment #37 of the Solid Time of Change aired on Saturday May-13-2017 (c/o CiTR.FM.101.9).

Podcast (Solid Time begins a few minutes in). Youtube playlist (sadly inaccurate).

The Solid Time of Change is our overlong yet incomplete history of the so-called Prog Rock era – 661 selections from 1965 through 1979 with which we hope to do justice to a strange and ambitious time indeed, musically speaking.

solid-crop-37

Part Thirty-Seven of the journey went as follows:

  1. Pink Floyd – one of these days
  2. Triumvirat – Mister Ten Percent
  3. Triumvirat – million dollars
  4. Beatles – tomorrow never knows
  5. Hawkwind – silver machine
  6. Soft Machine – moon in June [excerpts]
  7. Robert Wyatt – Alifib
  8. Robert Wyatt – Alifie
  9. Robert Wyatt – little red robin hood goes riding
  10. David Bowie – quicksand
  11. Genesis – stagnation
  12. Peter Hammill – (this side of) the looking glass
  13. Van Der Graaf Generator – house with no door

Fresh episodes air pretty much every Saturday night, starting 11 pm (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9, with streaming and download options available within twenty-four hours via our Facebook page.

33. The Solid Time Of Change

Installment #33 of the Solid Time of Change aired on Saturday March-25-2017 (c/o CiTR.FM.101.9).

Podcast (Solid Time begins a few minutes in). Youtube playlist (somewhat inaccurate).

The Solid Time of Change is our overlong yet incomplete history of the so-called Prog Rock era – 661 selections from 1965 through 1979 with which we hope to do justice to a strange and ambitious time indeed, musically speaking.

solid-crop-33

Part Thirty-Three of the journey went as follows:

  1. Jethro Tull – skating away on the thin ice of a new day
  2. David Bowie – starman
  3. David Bowie – moonage daydream
  4. Hawkwind – space is deep
  5. Jon Anderson – flight of the moorglade
  6. Jon Anderson – solid space
  7. Jon Anderson – Moon Ra
  8. Jon Anderson – song of search
  9. Yes – Remembering the Ancient
  10. Gong – psychological overture
  11. Gong – The Isle of Everywhere
  12. Gong – master builder

Fresh episodes air pretty much every Saturday night, starting 11 pm (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9, with streaming and download options available within twenty-four hours via our Facebook page.

823. Andy Warhol

In which David Bowie, on the cusp of mega icon-dom himself, gives credit where it’s due, though apparently Andy Warhol didn’t much care for the song himself. Neither did Philip Random’s musician friend Tim, who took issue with the lyrics. “Trying a bit too hard, don’t you think? But man, that guitar riff’s a killer!”

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