359. madman across the water

“I suppose I was born just early enough to remember a time when Elton John was not a big deal pop supernova, but rather a cool underground item, more for the older kids. Like Russ (boyfriend of a friend’s big sister) who insisted that Madman Across the Water was about Richard Nixon and Watergate, the crazy mess he’d made of things. He was the madman destroying everything he touched. Which kind of made sense in 1973. Except I later realized it was a 1971 record, and the Watergate break-ins didn’t even happen until 1972, and didn’t get much media coverage until after Mr. Nixon got himself massively re-elected with pretty much the biggest majority in American political history. Mad and confusing times, no question. Lots of scary shadows forming across the water, maybe throwing time itself out of joint. Who knew the what of anything? Except the music. The music was amazing.” (Philip Random)

EltonJohn-1971-serious

 

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711. Panic in Detroit

“As I remember it, David Bowie hit the suburbs of the Americas in comparatively slow motion. First came Space Oddity (a big deal AM radio hit in early 1973, some three years after it had hit big in the UK), then Ziggy Stardust (various album tracks popping up in the fringes of FM radio), by which point you were starting to see pictures of the guy. Beyond freakish. Which were backed up by the inevitable rumours (that he actually was an alien, that he and Elton John were secretly married). But by the end of the year, all that stuff was settling, and it was the music you couldn’t ignore. So Much Great And Strange Music. Entire albums overflowing with it. So much so that a track like Panic in Detroit didn’t get near the attention it deserved. If only for the riff. You could base a whole genre on that riff. Which, it’s arguable, the Rolling Stones already had. But where the hell were they in 1973?” (Philip Random)

Bowie-1973

 

27. The Solid Time Of Change

Installment #27 of the Solid Time of Change aired on Saturday January-21-2016 (c/o CiTR.FM.101.9).

Podcast (Solid Time begins a few minutes in). Youtube playlist (incomplete and somewhat inaccurate).

The Solid Time of Change is our overlong yet incomplete history of the so-called Prog Rock era – 661 selections from 1965 through 1979 with which we hope to do justice to a strange and ambitious time indeed, musically speaking.

solid-crop-27

Part Twenty-Seven of the journey went as follows:

  1. Santana – A1 funk, every step of the way
  2. Jesus Christ Superstar Original London Cast – heaven on their minds
  3. Jimi Hendrix – third stone from the sun
  4. Manfred Mann’s Earth Band – earth hymn [1+2]
  5. Elton John – Madman Across the Water
  6. Klaatu – around the universe in eighty days
  7. FM – one o’clock tomorrow
  8. Agitation Free – you will play for us today
  9. Agitation Free – Khan el Khalili
  10. Agitation Free – Ala Tul
  11. Magma – de futura

Fresh episodes air pretty much every Saturday night, starting 11 pm (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9, with streaming and download options available within twenty-four hours via our Facebook page.

884. Where to now, St Peter?

Cool and soulful non-hit from Elton John‘s third album, 1970’s Tumbleweed Connection, which Philip Random maintains is his best “… mainly because it preceded the absurd levels of mega-hugeness that so devoured him by mid-decade. Apparently it’s a concept album concerning country themes, cowboys, dust, lust and, in the case of Where to Now St Peter? some heartfelt gospel yearning which truly sets the guy’s voice free. I mean, has any other white man, before or since, ever sung the word blue so thoroughly, completely, rhapsodically …?”

eltonjohn-1970

959. Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy

Elton John (whose real name was Reginald Dwight) was beyond huge through the first half of the 1970s  – ten studio albums (plus one soundtrack) between 1969 and 1975 and none of them awful. Captain Fantastic and the Brown Dirt Cowboy was the last truly good one though, with the title track still sounding darned fine, mainly because it didn’t get overplayed at the time unlike so much else.

eltonjohn-live75

10. The Solid Time Of Change

Part ten of the Solid Time of Change  aired Saturday July-16-2016 c/o CiTR.FM.101.9.

Podcast (Solid Time begins at about five minutes in). Youtube playlist (not entirely accurate).

The Solid Time of Change continues to be Randophonic’s main focus, an overlong yet incomplete history of the so-called Prog Rock era (presented in countdown form) – 661 records from 1965 through 1979 with which we hope to do justice to a strange and ambitious and only occasionally absurd time, musically speaking.

solid-crop-10

Part ten of the journey went as follows:

  1. Godley + Creme – The Flood
  2. Godley + Crème – some more pieces of consequence
  3. Elton John – rocket man
  4. Klaatu – calling occupants of interplanetary craft
  5. Klaatu – little neutrino
  6. Jethro Tull – only solitaire
  7. Jethro Tull – back-door angels
  8. Jethro Tull – Two Fingers
  9. Fleetwood Mac -searching for Madge
  10. UK – in the dead of night
  11. UK – by the light of day
  12. UK – presto vivace + in the dead of night [reprise]
  13. PFM – the world became the world
  14. Synergy – on presuming to be modern – 1
  15. Synergy – Phobos + Deimos go to Mars
  16. Synergy – terra icognita
  17. Synergy – on presuming to be modern – 3
  18. Renaissance – on the frontier

Fresh episodes air pretty much every Saturday night, starting 11 pm (Pacific time) c/o CiTR.FM.101.9, with streaming and download options available within twenty-four hours via our Facebook.